Shared: Credit Karma leases new San Francisco headquarters in 760 Market St. (SF Business Times)

By Blanca Torres

Thor Equities owns the Phelan Building at 760 Market St. in San Francisco.

Thor Equities owns the Phelan Building at 760 Market St. in San Francisco.

Another tech company is expanding in San Francisco. Credit Karma, an online credit score provider, took the last remaining space — 46,000 square feet on two floors ­— in the Phelan Building at 760 Market St.

Credit Karma, which recently raised $85 million in a round of financing led by Google Capital, joins other tech tenants that have moved into the historic Phelan such as Medium, a new venture from Twitter co-founder Evan Williams; Voxer, a maker of a ‘walkie talkie’ app; and Appirio, a global cloud consulting group. On the non-tech side, Sears, the department store chain, leases space for its West Coast apparel office.

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Shared: S.F. building aims to produce as much energy as it consumes (SFGate)

By David R. Baker

The skylights' "dynamic glass" tints in the sun, letting in light while minimizing heat. Photo: Brant Ward, The Chronicle

The skylights' "dynamic glass" tints in the sun, letting in light while minimizing heat. Photo: Brant Ward, The Chronicle

On a rare sweltering day in San Francisco, the new office of DPR Construction stays cool and pleasant.

But don't credit the air conditioning. It isn't on.

Large fans circulate air. Skylights turn dark when the sun beats down, letting in light while minimizing heat. Tilted rows of solar panels shield the roof while producing a steady stream of electricity.

Recently renovated by DPR, the North Beach building should generate as much energy as it uses in any given year. If all its systems work as planned, it will be San Francisco's first "zero net energy" office, and possibly a glimpse into California's future.

"It's a little jewel box that we're turning into something pretty special," said Ted van der Linden, DPR's director of sustainability.

 

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Shared: Hunters Point Shipyard transformation in home buyers' hands (SFGate)

By J.K. Dineen

Hunters Point Shipyard transformation in home buyers' hands (SFGate)

Michael Brown sprays down the land at the Shipyard, the new development at Hunters Point in San Francisco. Photo: Tim Hussin, Special To The Chronicle

Michael Brown sprays down the land at the Shipyard, the new development at Hunters Point in San Francisco. Photo: Tim Hussin, Special To The Chronicle

Since 1997 Lennar Urban has been selling its vision of a revitalized Hunters Point Shipyard to everyone from Bayview district neighbors to union bosses to environmentalists.

Now the builder is ready to start selling to the one group that matters to its shareholders: home buyers.

With the wooden frames of 88 town houses and flats marching up the hillside off Innes Avenue, Lennar is putting the final touches on its "welcome center": a 3,500-square-foot industrial chic modular building with a fireplace, comfy seating and an expansive deck overlooking the bay.

While 88 homes is a modest number in a city with thousands of units under construction, it's important because it is the start of arguably the most ambitious real estate development plan in the city's history: a $7 billion, 750-acre project aimed at transforming an abandoned Navy complex into a neighborhood with 12,000 homes and millions of square feet of office and retail space.

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Shared: SoMa's Big Residential Trade (BisNow)

SoMa's Big Residential Trade 

Via BisNow Newsletter (San Francisco > Commercial Real Estate)

Build Group's rendering of the tower, which is currently known as 1401-1415 Mission.

Build Group's rendering of the tower, which is currently known as 1401-1415 Mission.

We just learned about yet another residential site near Twitter that's making headlines (so we'll keep this lead under 140 characters).

Behringer Harvard just scooped up 1401 Mission, which is already underway at the corner of 10th and Mission. Sources also tell us the deal closed last Friday. The Addison, Texas-based housing giant currently doesn't have a huge local presence; one of its only other S.F. properties is Argenta, a 179-unit luxury high-rise at 1 Polk. The Behringer camp did not respond by press time to a request for comment. About two years ago Martin Building Co bought the site, then an auto repair shop. (Which we learned a year and a half ago when we tried to get our axles realigned.)

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Shared: S.F. Mayor Counts Existing Homes to Hit Affordable Housing Goal (SF Public Press)

By Noah Arroyo and Josh Wolf

Nearly 40% of subsidized units cited already exist

In a speech so subtly phrased that it threw off the New York Times, CNN and several local news outlets, San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee seemed to promise early this year that the city would build at least 10,000 homes for poor and middle-class residents within six years.

But the mayor’s current housing forecast, which counts up planned construction projects, shows that barely 6,000 of these affordable homes would be new. The remainder, up to 40 percent of the total, would consist of rehabilitated public housing. While repairing those homes will benefit the low-income tenants who live in them, doing so would add little or no new housing.

The mayor’s housing staff readily supplied details about the projects that went into his housing plan. But they did not respond to subsequent requests for comment about how rehabilitated units would address the city’s crisis in affordable housing, as skyrocketing prices leave few options for those who cannot afford the market rate.

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