San Francisco

JUST LISTED: Historic building - 2501 Ocean Avenue (Lakeside) - IN CONTRACT

2501ocean_justlisted.jpg

PROPERTY OVERVIEW

2501 Ocean Avenue is located in the heart of the Lakeside District with high visibility and heavy foot traffic. Subject property occupies the tip of the triangular parcel of land where Eucalyptus Drive intersects Ocean Avenue, facing toward Junipero Serra Boulevard. 

  • Built by Harold G. Stoner in 1940, in the Streamline Moderne style -- an offshoot of the Art Deco style 
  • Surrounded by affluent neighborhoods such as St. Francis Wood, Merced Manor, West Portal, Balboa Terrace, Ingleside Terrace, and Forest Hill
  • Numbers of shops, services, eateries, parks/playgrounds, and schools on Ocean Avenue and surrounding areas in close proximity
  • Within a 1.5-mile radius: Stonestown Galleria, Trader Joe's, Olive Garden, Macy's Nordstrom, YMCA, SAn Francisco State University, Citibank, Stern Grove 
  • Easy access to Muni buses and lightrail, along Junipero Serra Boulevard, Ocean Avenue, and 19th Avenue (Muni buses arrive on average every 7 minutes) 
  • Quick and convenient commute options also include quick access to I-280, which links with points south and east, as well as Highway 1 (19th Avenue), less than two blocks away
  • Plenty of off-site parking with parking lot across the street

NEIGHBORHOOD: LAKESIDE

Lakeside is a long, narrow neighborhood in southwest San Francisco, located between the Stonestown and Ingleside Terrace neighborhoods.  Despite its name, Lakeside is not next to the nearby Lake Merced, but it is very close to San Francisco State University and the Stonestown Galleria.  Bordered by Junipero Serra Boulevard and 19th Avenue, two of the busiest streets in San Francisco, Lakeside is a well-kept and surprisingly tranquil haven in the midst of a bustling city. 

Despite its seemingly out-of-the-way location in the outlying reaches of San Francisco, Lakeside is actually well situated.  In addition to a number of shops, services, and eateries at the northern end of the neighborhood, the Stonestown Galleria, which is literally across the street to the west, offers many conveniences and amenities (including Trader Joe’s and Macys).  Public transportation, which includes bus service and light rail, is readily available making the commute quick and convenient.  I-280 which links with points south and east is a few blocks away, and Highway 1 (19th Avenue), heading north toward Marin is just outside the door.

Developed by Stoneson Development Company in the years between 1936 and 1950, Lakeside was a pricey subdivision for its time, offering lovely homes and embracing the modern notion of putting utility lines underground.  Although most of the homes are relatively modest by today’s standards they are attractive and well maintained.  Several homes are a little more luxurious – including the “mansions” that the Stoneson brothers built for themselves.  Many homes in Lakeside still sport the white picket fences that were considered a signature for the neighborhood in its early years, offering the neighborhood an old-fashioned charm.

OFFERING MEMORANDUM

To view or download the offering memorandum, please click here.

CONTACT

For additional information regarding subject property or if you'd like to inquire about other listings, please contact Brian Leung at (415) 288-7881 or email at brian.leung@colliers.com. 

Shared: You Must Make At Least $137,129 A Year To Afford A Home In San Francisco (Huffington Post)

By Hunter Stuart

 You need to make a gross salary of at least $137,129 a year to be able to afford the base costs of owning a median-priced home in San Francisco, according to a new report from mortgage-tracker HSH Associates. | Mitchell Funk via Getty Images

You need to make a gross salary of at least $137,129 a year to be able to afford the base costs of owning a median-priced home in San Francisco, according to a new report from mortgage-tracker HSH Associates. | Mitchell Funk via Getty Images

You'd better get a promotion (or six) if you ever want to afford even a moderately-priced home in San Francisco.

You need make at least $137,129 a year (before taxes) to afford a home in the Fog City, which according to a new report is the most expensive city in the country for home buyers.

Please click here to read the rest of the article from Huffington Post.

---------------------------------------------------------------------

For more news on San Francisco happenings, including news on real estate, global investments, local Bay Area news, please follow my Facebook page here.

Shared: Credit Karma leases new San Francisco headquarters in 760 Market St. (SF Business Times)

By Blanca Torres

  Thor Equities owns the Phelan Building at 760 Market St. in San Francisco.

Thor Equities owns the Phelan Building at 760 Market St. in San Francisco.

Another tech company is expanding in San Francisco. Credit Karma, an online credit score provider, took the last remaining space — 46,000 square feet on two floors ­— in the Phelan Building at 760 Market St.

Credit Karma, which recently raised $85 million in a round of financing led by Google Capital, joins other tech tenants that have moved into the historic Phelan such as Medium, a new venture from Twitter co-founder Evan Williams; Voxer, a maker of a ‘walkie talkie’ app; and Appirio, a global cloud consulting group. On the non-tech side, Sears, the department store chain, leases space for its West Coast apparel office.

Please click here to read the rest of the article from San Francisco Business Times.

---------------------------------------------------------------------

For more news on San Francisco happenings, including news on real estate, global investments, local Bay Area news, please follow my Facebook page here.

Shared: S.F. building aims to produce as much energy as it consumes (SFGate)

By David R. Baker

 The skylights' "dynamic glass" tints in the sun, letting in light while minimizing heat. Photo: Brant Ward, The Chronicle

The skylights' "dynamic glass" tints in the sun, letting in light while minimizing heat. Photo: Brant Ward, The Chronicle

On a rare sweltering day in San Francisco, the new office of DPR Construction stays cool and pleasant.

But don't credit the air conditioning. It isn't on.

Large fans circulate air. Skylights turn dark when the sun beats down, letting in light while minimizing heat. Tilted rows of solar panels shield the roof while producing a steady stream of electricity.

Recently renovated by DPR, the North Beach building should generate as much energy as it uses in any given year. If all its systems work as planned, it will be San Francisco's first "zero net energy" office, and possibly a glimpse into California's future.

"It's a little jewel box that we're turning into something pretty special," said Ted van der Linden, DPR's director of sustainability.

 

Please click here to read the rest of the article from SFGate.

---------------------------------------------------------------------

For more news on San Francisco happenings, including news on real estate, global investments, local Bay Area news, please follow my Facebook page here.

Please contact brian.leung@colliers.com
for business inquiries, listing information, and comments.

Copyright © Brian Leung | Colliers International. All rights reserved.